An Extra-Rare Original Woodstock Concert Poster Could Command $2,500 at Heritage Auctions

Woodstock Festival Poster Signed by Artist Arnold Skolnik (1969)_edited

What you see: An original 1969 Woodstock concert poster that shows just the artwork–no small text–and is signed by Arnold Skolnik, the artist who designed it. It’s in Very Good Plus condition and is estimated at $2,500.

How rare are original Woodstock concert posters in general, and how rare is it to find one that lacks the band names, the concert dates, and other small text? “Woodstock concert posters are rare, and this one is unusual,” says Giles Moon, consignment director of entertainment and music memorabilia at Heritage Auctions, adding, “I think that purist concert poster collectors want the version used to advertise the concert.”

The lot just before this one in the sale is a signed original Woodstock poster that has the small text. Its starting bid is $1,000, but the starting bid for this poster is $1,250. Why? “That’s intriguing. I’m not certain why that is,” he says, noting that this is the first artwork-only original Woodstock poster that he has handled. “This one might be more unusual, and that might be why there’s a higher starting bid on it.”

The poster is signed by Arnold Skolnik, the artist who designed it. Does that add to its value? “It adds several hundred dollars to the poster,” he says. “It doesn’t double the value, but it adds 20 to 30 percent. It’s difficult to say how many original Woodstock concert posters he signed. The majority of the originals have not been signed. In 2009, we sold one for $1,000, and I would expect the price to have jumped a bit since then.”

Were Woodstock posters collected at the time of the concert, or only later on? “It’s nearly always the case that they’re collected later on. That’s why the posters are so rare,” Moon says. “No one imagined they’d become collectible or valuable. They were just discarded. People who saved them were keeping them for aesthetic reasons.”

What makes this poster so successful? “It’s a simple, strong image that gets across the concept of what the festival was,” he says. “And it was a departure from the psychedelia as well. Lots of posters were trippy, intricate and complicated. This is simplistic.”

How to bid: The artwork-only original Woodstock concert poster is lot #89705 in Heritage Auctions’s Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction on June 17 and 18 in Beverly Hills, Calif.

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Text is copyright Sheila Gibson Stoodley. Image is courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

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SOLD! Wright Sold That Amazing Macchie Vase for $8,450

223_1_the_design_collection_of_dimitri_levas_june_2017_francesco_ferro_e_figlio_macchie_vase__wright_auction

Update: The macchie vase sold for $8,450.

What you see: A macchie (mah-key-aye) vase created circa 1890 by the Italian company Francesco Ferro e Figlio. Wright estimates it at $4,000 to $6,000.

What is Francesco Ferro e Figlio? It was a company founded in 1880 by Francesco Ferro and his son, Ferdinando. It ceased doing business under this name after Francesco died in 1901.

Wait, this vase was made in 1890? The late 19th century? Seriously? “So many 19th century pieces really do look modern,” says Sara Blumberg, a consultant for Wright. “This has no handles and no great ornamentation except for the glass itself. They really were making a step forward out of the baroque.”

How difficult would this have been to make in 1890? “Regardless of the technique, there are great losses. There’s a level of difficulty when dealing with different types of glass in the same vessel. You can think of it as studio glass in that regard,” she says. “A lot of the aspects are dependent on the day, the blower, the conditions, and luck as well.”

The vase stands 12 inches tall. Did its size pose a challenge to the glassblower? “Generally speaking, the larger a vessel becomes, the more difficult it is to make,” Blumberg says. “Twelve inches may not seem incredibly large, but for the 19th century, it is.”

Is it unique? “It’s unique in the sense that every vase is hand-blown. But in 25 years, I’ve never handled one,” she says. “It’s really very rare.”

What does “macchie” mean? It means “spot,” or “spotted.” It’s a literal description of the vase’s appearance.

What else makes this vase special? “It’s rather startling to look at. It’s a simple vessel, but there’s all this activity on the surface. It’s like looking at an abstract painting,” she says. “It’s quite early, but it has a modernity to it. There’s an artistic presence here that’s very intentional, and beautiful to see. That’s what makes the piece so exciting and rare. You don’t come across it very often.”

How to bid: The macchie vase is lot 223 in The Design Collection of Dimitri Levas, taking place June 8, 2017 at Wright.

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Text is copyright Sheila Gibson Stoodley. Image is courtesy of Wright.

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SOLD! The Brett Whiteley Painting Fetched $538,366 at Bonhams Sydney

Lot 37_Whiteley

Update: Brett Whiteley’s Hummingbird and Frangipani sold for AU $719,800, or $538,366, at Bonhams Sydney.

What you see: Hummingbird and Frangipani, a 1986 oil on board by Australian artist Brett Whiteley. It comes directly from its original owner to Bonhams, which estimates it at $280,000 to $350,000 in Australian dollars, or $210,000 to $260,000 in U.S. dollars.

Who is Brett Whiteley? He was one of the leading Australian artists of the 20th century. He traveled the world, living in England and the U.S. as well as Australia. In 1978 he achieved the feat of winning the Archibald Prize, the Sulman Prize, and the Wynne Prize, the only time all three prestigious Australian art awards have gone to the same person. Overall, he won each award twice. He made several attempts to quit alcohol and drugs, but ultimately died of an opiate overdose in 1992, at the age of 53.

How often did Whiteley portray hummingbirds and frangipani? “He was fascinated with birds, and painted them from the 1970s onward,” says Alex Clark, an Australian art specialist at Bonhams. “You can often find frangipani hidden in the backgrounds of his paintings. You can find them all over Sydney, and being a Sydney boy, he had a close connection to them. This is a very beautiful painting that combines two of his favorite subject matters.”

How often did he paint birds? “He’s renowned for his birds,” he says. “In general, the bird is a sign of peace and freedom. Whiteley led a bit of a tumultuous life. When he painted birds, he was in a happier place. It gave him a lot of joy.”

How does Hummingbird and Frangipani showcase Whiteley’s strengths? “He has an amazing ability to give movement to paintings,” Clark says. “In this, you see it in the beautiful sweeping line of the hummingbird’s wing.”

What else makes Hummingbird and Frangipani a strong Whiteley work? “It’s an extremely elegant work, and it has great wall power,” he says. “It’s exciting to handle a work of this nature, especially since no one has seen it for 30 years. And his bird paintings are very sought-after.”

How to bid: Whiteley’s Hummingbird and Frangipani is lot 37 in the Australian Art and Aboriginal Art auction at Bonhams Sydney on June 6.

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Text is copyright Sheila Gibson Stoodley. Image is courtesy of Bonhams.

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