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What you see: An 8-by-10-inch black-and-white publicity photograph of the Beatles, shot on March 24, 1964 by Dezo Hoffman and signed in blue pen by all four band members. Bonhams estimates it at £4,000 to £6,000 ($5,200 to $6,500).

How rare is it to see a print of this photo, signed by all the Beatles? “It’s not particularly rare, but to see it signed by all four on the front is unusual,” says Katherine Schofield, head of entertainment memorabilia at Bonhams. “Sometimes they signed it on the back, but it’s more desirable to have the signatures on the front.”

How rare is it to have anything that was signed by all of the Beatles? “Not that rare. They signed a hell of a lot–autograph books, fan club cards, albums, pieces of paper–Beatles signatures are not scarce,” she says. “A good set is still pretty common, and the market is discerning about what it wants. If it’s in good condition and more unusual, it bears stronger prices. Collectors tend to aim for signed albums, signed photos, and autograph pages. It’s tiered like that, but there’s a lot of things in between.”

What do you mean by “more unusual”? Schofield cited a piece of Buckingham Palace stationery, signed by the four in October 1965. It’s lot 165 in the same auction, estimated at £8,000 to £10,000 ($10,000 to $13,000). “I have seen another, but only one other,” Schofield says. She also mentioned a lot from the December 2016 Entertainment Memorabilia sale that was a plain British standard sheet of paper from 1963 on which each Beatle had drawn a caricature with their signatures. It commanded £21,250 ($27,425).

Are Beatles signatures from early in the band’s career worth more than signatures written later in the band’s career? “Very, very early signatures and later signature are sought after,” she says. “At the start of their career, not many signatures were asked for, and not many were kept. As the Beatles became less accessible in 1965 and definitely in 1966 and 1967, signatures are very sought after.”

This particular copy of the photo has tape marks, clipped corners, and other blemishes. Does that affect its value? “It’s a shame. It would be nicer if it was a cleaner image,” Schofield says. “But the damage does not affect the body of the photo. It’s visible, and the signatures are clear.”

This signed photo is fresh to market, going straight from the woman who received it as a preteen to Bonhams. How does that affect the value? “Provenance is important,” she says, explaining that the consignor’s father had been a vendor at the Scala Theatre when the Beatles filmed scenes for A Hard Day’s Night there. “She got onto the set and was given mementos, and this was one of the items she was given. She treasured it, and thought long and hard about selling it. We expect it to do well. The fact that it’s not dedicated [it’s not inscribed to a specific, named person] makes it more desirable. Normally the Beatles would put, ‘To Someone,’ and most people wanted them to do that. It’s nice that the photo has not been dedicated.”

How to bid: The signed Beatles photo is lot 162 in Bonhams’s Entertainment Memorabilia sale on June 28 in London.

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Image is courtesy of Bonhams.